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It’s not too late to get flu vaccination

Vaccine protects against three different viruses

Published: Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 7:00 a.m. CDT

(Continued from Page 1)

Flu vaccination coverage estimates from past years have shown that influenza vaccination activity drops quickly after the end of November.

The Grundy County Health Department reminds the community that flu activity usually peaks in February in the United States and can last as late as May.

As long as flu viruses are circulating, it’s not too late to get vaccinated.

Vaccination can provide protection against the flu and should continue. Even unvaccinated people who have already gotten sick with one flu virus can still benefit from vaccination since the flu vaccine protects against three different flu viruses that are predicted to be the ones that will circulate each season.

People at high risk for developing serious flu complications include children younger than 5 years, people 65 years of age and older, pregnant women, and people with certain long-term medical conditions, such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease, neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions, blood disorders, morbid obesity, kidney and liver disorders, HIV or AIDS, and cancer. For these people, getting the flu can mean more serious illness, including hospitalization, or it can mean a worsening of existing chronic conditions.

Please call (815) 941-3419 for more information or to make an appointment. Adult vaccines are given on Mondays by appointment.

Cost of adult flu regular dose vaccine is $25 for people 19 years of age and up.

High dose adult vaccine for those 65 and older is $45. Medicare and Medicaid cover the cost of the vaccine. People must present their card at the time of immunization. Children’s vaccines are given on Wednesdays by appointment.

The Illinois Department of Public Health’s Vaccine for Children program provides the vaccine for children 6 months to 18 years of age to those who meet the requirements: must reside in Grundy County; is an American Indian or Alaskan Native; have been enrolled in Medicaid or do not have health insurance that covers the cost of vaccines.

People who have insurance that pays for immunizations are not eligible to participate in this program.

A $15 donation is requested for children receiving vaccines under this program, but they will not be turned away because of inability to pay.

Cash or check is accepted. No debit or credit cards.

For more information, visit the Grundy County Health Department website at www.grundyhealth.com.

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